| Home | E-Submission | Sitemap | Contact Us |  
Clinical and Experimental Otorhinolaryngology > Accepted Articles
doi: https://doi.org/10.21053/ceo.2024.00034    [Accepted]
Positional obstructive sleep apnea and periodic limb movement during sleep: A large multi-center study
Jae Hyun Soh1 , Yun Jin Kang2 , Won-Hyuck Yoon3 , Chan-Soon Park4 , Hyun-Woo Shin3,5,6,7,8,9
1Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea
3OUaR LaB, Inc., Seoul, Korea
4Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, St. Vincent’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
5Department of Pharmacology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
6Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
7Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
8Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea
9Sensory Organ Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence  Chan-Soon Park ,Tel: +82-31-249-8968, Fax: +82-31-257-3752, Email: pcs0112@catholic.ac.kr
Hyun-Woo Shin ,Tel: +82-2-740-8285, Fax: +82-2-745-7996, Email: charlie@snu.ac.kr
Received: January 30, 2024; Revised: April 4, 2024   Accepted: April 29, 2024.  Published online: May 2, 2024.
*Jae Hyun Soh and Yun Jin Kang contributed equally to this work.
ABSTRACT
Objectives
The relationships among positional obstructive sleep apnea (POSA), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are unclear. We analyzed these relationships according to OSA severity and explored the underlying mechanisms.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed 6,140 eligible participants who underwent full-night diagnostic polysomnography in four clinical centers over a period of 5 years with eventsynchronized analysis. The PLMS index (PLMI) and periodic limb movements with arousal index (PLMAI) were evaluated. The effects of POSA on the PLMI, PLMAI, and PLMS were analyzed according to OSA severity.
Results
The mean PLMI and PLMAI, as well as PLMS prevalence, were significantly lower in those with severe OSA than in those with mild and moderate OSA. The mean PLMI was higher in mild OSA group than in control group. The mean PLMI (4.80 ± 12.71 vs. 2.59 ± 9.82 events/h, p < 0.001) and PLMAI (0.89 ± 3.66 vs. 0.53 ± 3.33 events/h, p < 0.001), and the prevalence of PLMS (11% vs. 5.3%, p < 0.001) were higher in patients with POSA than patients with non-POSA. This trend was particularly marked in severe OSA group (OR 1.55, 95%CI [1.07–2.27]) and less so in mild (OR 0.56, 95%CI [0.30–1.03]) and moderate (OR 1.82, 95%CI [0.99–3.34]) OSA groups.
Conclusion
The POSA group tended to have a higher prevalence of PLMS, particularly in those with severe OSA. If PLMS is prominent, diagnosis and treatment of POSA and OSA may be considered.
Keywords: Sleep apnea, Obstructive; Sleep Apnea Syndromes; Periodic Limb Movement Disorder; Sleep-Related Periodic Leg Movements, Excessive; Supine Position
TOOLS
Download PDF File  Download PDF File
Full text via DOI  Full text via DOI
Download Citation  Download Citation
Share:      
METRICS
0
Crossref
0
Scopus
1,560
View
19
Download
Related article
Editorial Office
Korean Society of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
103-307 Park Tower officetel, Yongsan-dong 5-ga, Yongsan-gu, Seoul 04385, Korea
TEL: +82-2-711-9091   FAX: +82-2-3487-6603   E-mail: editor.eceo@gmail.com
Copyright © Korean Society of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.                 Developed in M2PI
Close layer
prev next